Health News

At The Medicine Shoppe® Pharmacies, we are dedicated to providing products and services to care for your family’s wellness. One of those services is health news you can trust. Use the filters to focus on the information that is important to you, then bookmark this page to make it a regular stop anytime you’re online.


What Menopause Might Mean for Your Heart
Women who reached menopause at a younger age or never had a child had a raised risk of heart failure, according to a new study.
Headed for Menopause? Watch Your Health
Biological changes can have a significant impact on physical health not only after menopause, but also in the years leading up to it, a new study found.
Prehypertension in Pregnancy
Women who experience prehypertension during pregnancy may face an increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome post-delivery, according to a new study.
How Endometriosis Might Affect the Heart
Women with endometriosis may face a raised risk of heart disease, a new study found.
Moms-to-Be, How’s Your Heart?
Ask any mother — pregnancy isn’t all glowing skin and food cravings. It also includes its fair share of uncomfortable side effects and temporary health problems. And one of those health problems could indicate a larger issue.
Getting a Handle on Preeclampsia
Of all pregnancy-related complications, preeclampsia is probably the most difficult to detect. But there's some hopeful news on that front.
A Potential New Use for Metformin
One common diabetes drug may soon have a new indication.
Blood Thinners, the Pill and HRT: The New Findings
Women with a history of blood clots are often advised to stop hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or using birth control pills — even if they are already on a blood thinner. But a new discovery could change that.
Hormone Therapy for Women: Timing Matters
Hormone therapy for menopause has been a controversial subject for some time, primarily because of its link to heart disease risk.
Atrial Fibrillation: What Women Need to Know
Heart rhythm disorders affect more than 2 million Americans. The most common of these disorders is atrial fibrillation (AFib) — and it may affect women differently than men.